Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

Daniel Rosen "World Class Juggler Turned Million Dollar Software CEO" Show #206

May 19, 2024 Scott Edwards Season 5 Episode 206
Daniel Rosen "World Class Juggler Turned Million Dollar Software CEO" Show #206
Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"
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Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"
Daniel Rosen "World Class Juggler Turned Million Dollar Software CEO" Show #206
May 19, 2024 Season 5 Episode 206
Scott Edwards

Send us a Text Message.

It was such a pleasure to interview Comic/Juggler Daniel Rosen, he has had such a difficult yet amazing career. From the streets of Los Angeles at age 13, to the stages of New York & Vegas in his 20's, to several TV appearances throughout his 30's....Daniel Rosen has done it all. And if that wasn't enough, he took his talent for creation and focus to repairing credit...correct! He started and owns CreditRepairCloud.com. 
He shares stories about working with Mickey Rooney, Johnny Carson, Bob Barker, Bette Midler, David Strassman, Don Johnson, and many many more....an Amazing career!

Daniel Rosen is a remarkable individual known for his diverse and inspiring career journey; from a street performer and comedian to a successful software CEO. Starting his entertainment career as a mere 15-year-old, he honed his juggling and comedic talent on the tough streets of LA, even braving homelessness. His experiences and challenging circumstances shaped his resilient and tenacious spirit, instrumental in his transition from street performances to television and stage, and ultimately, to the helm of a multi-million dollar company in the credit repair industry. Despite adversities such as bullying and leaving home at a young age, Rosen found success through his unparalleled ability to adapt to different opportunities and to apply his talents and determination to new ventures. His extraordinary career path continues to be a symbol of dedication, innovation, and resilience, inspiring many along the way.

(00:00:59) Resilience and Creativity: Daniel Rosen's Journey
(00:06:49) Pivoting Performance: Embracing Comedy for Success

(00:16:26) Mickey Rooney's Influence on Broadway Newcomer

(00:19:59) "The Price is Right Announcer's Evolution"

(00:24:33) From Heartbreak to Musical Success Story

(00:32:49) From Comedy Clubs to Homeownership: Daniel Rosen's Journey

(00:42:20) Humor-Infused Journey to Software CEO

Support the Show.

Standup Comedy Podcast Network.co www.StandupComedyPodcastNetwork.com
Free APP on all Apple & Android phones....check it out, podcast, jokes, blogs, and More!

For short-form standup comedy sets, listen to: "Comedy Appeteasers" , available on all platforms.

New YouTube site: https://www.youtube.com/@standupcomedyyourhostandmc/videos
Videos of comics live on stage from back in the day.

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Interested in Standup Comedy? Check out my books on Amazon...
"20 Questions Answered about Being a Standup Comic"
"Be a Standup Comic...or just look like one"

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Show Notes Transcript

Send us a Text Message.

It was such a pleasure to interview Comic/Juggler Daniel Rosen, he has had such a difficult yet amazing career. From the streets of Los Angeles at age 13, to the stages of New York & Vegas in his 20's, to several TV appearances throughout his 30's....Daniel Rosen has done it all. And if that wasn't enough, he took his talent for creation and focus to repairing credit...correct! He started and owns CreditRepairCloud.com. 
He shares stories about working with Mickey Rooney, Johnny Carson, Bob Barker, Bette Midler, David Strassman, Don Johnson, and many many more....an Amazing career!

Daniel Rosen is a remarkable individual known for his diverse and inspiring career journey; from a street performer and comedian to a successful software CEO. Starting his entertainment career as a mere 15-year-old, he honed his juggling and comedic talent on the tough streets of LA, even braving homelessness. His experiences and challenging circumstances shaped his resilient and tenacious spirit, instrumental in his transition from street performances to television and stage, and ultimately, to the helm of a multi-million dollar company in the credit repair industry. Despite adversities such as bullying and leaving home at a young age, Rosen found success through his unparalleled ability to adapt to different opportunities and to apply his talents and determination to new ventures. His extraordinary career path continues to be a symbol of dedication, innovation, and resilience, inspiring many along the way.

(00:00:59) Resilience and Creativity: Daniel Rosen's Journey
(00:06:49) Pivoting Performance: Embracing Comedy for Success

(00:16:26) Mickey Rooney's Influence on Broadway Newcomer

(00:19:59) "The Price is Right Announcer's Evolution"

(00:24:33) From Heartbreak to Musical Success Story

(00:32:49) From Comedy Clubs to Homeownership: Daniel Rosen's Journey

(00:42:20) Humor-Infused Journey to Software CEO

Support the Show.

Standup Comedy Podcast Network.co www.StandupComedyPodcastNetwork.com
Free APP on all Apple & Android phones....check it out, podcast, jokes, blogs, and More!

For short-form standup comedy sets, listen to: "Comedy Appeteasers" , available on all platforms.

New YouTube site: https://www.youtube.com/@standupcomedyyourhostandmc/videos
Videos of comics live on stage from back in the day.

Please Write a Review: in-depth walk-through for leaving a review.

Interested in Standup Comedy? Check out my books on Amazon...
"20 Questions Answered about Being a Standup Comic"
"Be a Standup Comic...or just look like one"

Announcer:

This is another episode of stand up comedy. Your host and MC celebrating 40 plus years on the fringe of show business. Stories, interviews and comedy sets from the famous and not so famous. Here's your host and MC, Scott Edwards.

R. Scott Edwards:

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome back to the podcast. We have another great interview for you. This young man started off as a juggler at quite a young age, but he was able to turn that into a huge career in show business. He went on to television and stage so many great stories, but we should just hear it from him. Ladies and gentlemen, help me welcome Daniel Rosen.

Daniel Rosen:

Thank you. Oh, you're too kind. Please, please don't stop.

R. Scott Edwards:

Hey, Daniel.

Daniel Rosen:

I love that applause.

R. Scott Edwards:

We had a chance to work together back in the nineties and you have had just an amazing career, starting off as a juggler on the streets of LA, turning that into a really tight comedy juggling set. And then that led to other things. But what I wanted to share with the audience is you've had such a challenging and difficult story, if you don't mind sharing. I know you started a young age. What got you into juggling?

Daniel Rosen:

I don't know. I was a really weird little kid. I didn't have a very good home life and I wasn't very good in school. I just obsessed about juggling. I learned at ten, and from the moment I learned, that's all I did. I would juggle like 8 hours a day.

R. Scott Edwards:

That's young for almost anybody I've talked to. That's a young age.

Daniel Rosen:

Yeah. And getting good at juggling came in really handy because a few years later, at 13, I left home and I left home and left school and I was kind of homeless on the street, and I made money to eat by juggling on street corners.

R. Scott Edwards:

No, it's how I got started, Daniel, that's, that's, that's tough. I mean, I was out of the house at about 1516, and I know how difficult that was. 13, I can't even imagine. And I didn't have any talents like you. But juggling on the streets of LA, were you, did you feel safe or did it? I mean, you survived, obviously, but that had to be difficult.

Daniel Rosen:

It was difficult. It was scary. But I was really driven with this performing thing. And then I started to learn that if I was funny, people would put more money in my hat. And then comedy started become more and more present in my ad.

R. Scott Edwards:

And so it wasn't a necessity to get into comedy clubs on the street. It made a difference in your tips.

Daniel Rosen:

Yeah, I could eat better. Yeah, it really did make a difference.

R. Scott Edwards:

So was it material about the juggling and the particular bits, or were you interacting with the audience or kind of explain it for those that don't get it?

Daniel Rosen:

Well, it was a mishmash of all of that. Plus, I had weird props and inventions and all kinds of crazy stuff, and I also played a bunch of instruments. So basically everything I ever learned how to do was in this show that I would do. And I did it on the streets for many years until I got really good at juggling. I got so good at juggling, I became a world champion juggler. But I was still working on the street. I was 18, and I got this idea that I wanted to do something big time, but I thought, I can't work in Las Vegas. I'm too young. They won't let me in those casinos. I could be in the circus, but that's gross. So then I thought, I'm going to be in the ice Capades, because they'd had another guy who juggled in the ice Capades. And so I went to the skating rink, and I said, I'd like to have ice skating lessons, please, because I'm going to be in the ice Capades. And they said, have you ever skated before? And I said, no. And they thought I was crazy. But I started training to be an ice skater, and a few years later, by rehearsing my juggling on the skates and doing all this training, I got into the ice cape.

R. Scott Edwards:

Yeah, that's just crazy. Crazy, you know, off the wall thinking, I want to go back just a minute. First off, you weren't the only guy that cut his teeth on the streets. I know. Penn and Teller, Harry Anderson.

Daniel Rosen:

Yeah.

R. Scott Edwards:

And those were both magic. Although Penn does juggling. But the idea that Michael Davis. Oh, just so many people got their start on, on the streets of San Francisco, New York, or LA. That challenge is something so difficult to overcome and yet at the same time, really established a foundation of not only your talent, but the interaction with the audience. And I was going to refer to it later because I have some material of yours I'd like to share with the audience. But I also didn't realize what a musician you were. And that started on the streets as.

Daniel Rosen:

Well, roughly, a little bit. I was. Sometimes I played banjo on my unicycle, but it was years later, these comedy clubs. I started playing guitar and singing and doing all kinds of harmonica, all kinds of stuff.

R. Scott Edwards:

What's amazing about that is that I had a chance to help develop talent like Dana Carvey and what was interesting about him that set him aside from the other stand up comics was not only could he do a straight monology, you know, comedy act, but he played music and he did impressions, and he had ethnic adaptions to his voice, and he was really many different types of acts. And one, and it sounds like, Daniel, that those years on the streets forced you financially. It was beneficial to adapt and learn many different things. Now, turning that and making a decision to go into the ice Capades, I mean, whoo. That's like, out of left field. I don't even know how you thought of that, but what a great inspiration to people to realize that if you pick your dream and you're willing to work hard enough, I mean, fricking learning how to ice skate in LA? Come on.

Daniel Rosen:

Sure. It was pretty weird. And I had. So the Ice Capades. I set out to do this really serious juggling act, but then at the audition, they said, we like your show. We think we want to have you, but you can't use any of that music. It was this serious juggling act, and I was wearing spandex. It was all timed out to music. Lots of fire. They said, you can't use any of that music. So we brought this guy. He's going to rewrite all the music sideways, and you won't know the difference. It'll sound just like your music, but we'll own it. We want to pay royalties, and we want to see the act with the new music in a month. So I went, okay. And the guy said, oh, I'll have the music to you in a week. And then a week went by, two weeks and three weeks. Then it's. It's like the day before my next audition, and he finally gives me the music, and it's nothing like what my music was. It was nothing like it at all, and it was a disaster. He just gave me the stuff that was in his drawer or something. I don't know. But I'm trying to do my audition, and I'm dropping things because I can't keep up with the music. It's completely the wrong tempo, and I'm falling. It was a disaster. I was so upset because I had blown my second audition, and I wasn't going to be in the ice capes, and I'd spent a couple years telling everybody I was going to be in the ice capades. And then I go down to do street shows on Venice beach that weekend, and I'm setting up to do my show there. I see walking down the street. Is there down the boardwalk there is the producer of the ice capes, Bob Turk, the one I just blown my audition for. And I went, oh, shit. I can't let him see me. I can't let him know that I'm just a street performer because I kind of had made up stories and said I was working in Vegas and doing all these big things. So I hid behind a tree. I hid behind a tree. And then half an hour later, I thought, he'll be long gone. And I sat up and I did my show, and I drawn a big. Drew a big crowd. And the end of my act, I would ride this tall unicycle. And I learned how to ride it because I would draw such a big crowd. That was how I could see if the police were coming. And I got on my tall unicycle, and there in the audience is Bob Turk, the producer of the ice Capades. I go, shit. Now, not only did I blow the audition, now he knows I'm just a street performer. What am I going to say? And he disappeared. It was strange. He just disappeared. And then a few days later, my phone rang and the guy said, hey, this is Bob Turk. I said, yeah. He said, you know that very serious juggling act you did? I hated that. But that comedy thing you did at the beach, that's what we want. So I ended up doing a whole different act than I ever had planned on. And I'm doing comedy in the ice Capades. I had a microphone. It was really fun.

R. Scott Edwards:

Oh, wow.

Daniel Rosen:

So, yeah, it was an amazing experience to go from the streets to being in these giant stadiums or arenas is where they would play. And so it taught me stage presence, but I thought it'd be this really great environment with all these athletes, but instead they were all alcoholics and drug addicts and terrible, terrible people. It was just a really bad environment.

R. Scott Edwards:

Yeah, we're ruining the vision people have of the ice Capades. But I think, again, you pass over such important information, and that is that you worked really hard years to develop a serious act for the ice Capades. And yet what got you the gig was your going back to your basics, your foundation, we talked about earlier, which was comedy, juggling and music and the different things that you entertained on the streets of Venice and the fact that you were able. I mean, just dumb luck that you got seen by the producer and brought back into the show. That was the way show business works. If you work hard, things happen for you. It sounds like the ice Capades wasn't your dream.

Daniel Rosen:

No, it was a bad environment. Yeah. But then once I was there, I realized, well, I'll tell you the other thing. Everyone, they were all drunk. Everyone would drink. Like, we had these long bus rides, and it was so uncomfortable. The only way to stand it was to get drunk. So we'd all be drinking scotch at six in the morning, getting on the bus, so you could just pass out and wake up in the new city. And after a few months, at this point, I'm 18 or 19, and I started realizing, hey, if I keep doing this, I'm going to have a problem. But I realized at that same time, so I stopped. I stopped the drinking. And I also realized, hey, I really like this comedy thing. I want to go all in on comedy. I want to get out of the ice captain and start working in comedy clubs. And that's what I did. I went in and I auditioned at the Improv in Hollywood, and I got on. I was lucky because I already had an act. Most people who would go and audition at a comedy club don't have an act yet.

R. Scott Edwards:

Right, right. You were actually a seasoned pro. Even though you're 1819, you're a seasoned pro from your years on the streets and now a couple years in the ice capades, you understood the importance of interacting with an audience. You had the timing of when to do the comedy joke or bit about the juggling. Was it Bud Freedman that hired you?

Daniel Rosen:

Bud Freedman? Yeah, I became a regular there and worked there for many years.

R. Scott Edwards:

Oh, man.

Daniel Rosen:

Well, for $35 a show.

R. Scott Edwards:

Well, I paid you more than that. But the.

Daniel Rosen:

You did comedy. You gave me really good gig.

R. Scott Edwards:

The comedy producers of clubs really appreciated talent like you because, as you mentioned, a lot of the, the reason that comedy clubs were established were as a stepping stone success of future entertainers. You know, there'd be a thousand people that could go on stage, and by the time you got to the top five, they had a shot, maybe at a sitcom or doing some tv or something. But as you mentioned, most people weren't prepared and needed to be trained on audience interaction and timing and had to get their, you know, kind of earn their way in show business. You came along as a complete package. And again, we want the audience to understand you're not just the type of juggler that you might see at some clown party or something. You were already world class rated, and then you were adding the comedy and the music and the props. I mean, I remember how much fun it was having you at my club, but I'm sure that you did really well at comedy clubs. Across the country I did for many years.

Daniel Rosen:

But I want to thank you. I want to take a moment to thank you for the gigs you gave me, because, you know, a career in show business even, I had a lot of highs. I did a lot of tv shows. I did a lot of big gigs, but there's a lot of nothing in between. And when you hired me at your club at laughs Unlimited, I needed that gig. I needed to pay rent. I needed it to eat. And I want to thank you because you really helped me during a rough time.

R. Scott Edwards:

Oh, well, you're obviously welcome, but I think it was mutually beneficial because you did so well with the audiences. You were the type of act that as a club owner and booker, I didn't have to be concerned about the professional level of expertise and delivery of the material. And as I was trying to say, that is so important to club owners that when you have an act that you know what you're getting and you know that they understand their responsibility as entertainers, and you brought that a thousand percent. Now, what was exciting about your career? And I don't know the whole story. So take me in the, in the precision, because at one point, you ended up being the announcer. Well, you, you ended up on Carson Johnny.

Daniel Rosen:

I did.

R. Scott Edwards:

How did Johnny see you?

Daniel Rosen:

Well, they knew me from my corner, and I kept trying to get on the Tonight show, and Jim McCauley, the Booker, kept saying, you're not ready yet. You're not ready yet. And then it wasn't until after, it was after I did sugar babies. I was in the Broadway show Sugar babies. Michael Davis did the original spot in the, in that show. And that was with Mickey, Mickey Rooney and Ann Miller. Yeah. And all these great old burlesque comics. Yeah. And so there would, in the original version, it was Michael Davis and Ron Lucas were the two variety acts and Michael Davis being a comedy juggler and Ron Lucas being a ventriloquist. And then in the version that I was, I was in, it was me and Jeff Dunham. Yeah. Yeah. I guess we shared a dressing room for like three years.

R. Scott Edwards:

Yeah. Some people might know that name. He ended up doing okay. Now was this in LA or New York?

Daniel Rosen:

It was in New York, and then we also traveled. Yeah. It became the bus and truck traveling to all major cities.

R. Scott Edwards:

Wow.

Daniel Rosen:

Yeah.

R. Scott Edwards:

But that was a great experience to play Broadway. Is it? You know, I mean, sure, you're a juggler, and some people don't think that's the same as being an actor, but when you take an actor slash juggler and you put him in a show like sugar babies with people like Mickey Rooney. I mean, what, and you couldn't have been very old. That had to be an amazing experience.

Daniel Rosen:

I think I was 21, 22, something like that. I was pretty young. Yeah. Mickey Rooney was amazing. He could do, he could do stand up, he could do impressions, even current people. He could jump in the orchestra pit and play every single instrument.

R. Scott Edwards:

Wow.

Daniel Rosen:

It was great. Yeah. But he was also insane when I'd be out there. He couldn't stand it if I was doing well, and he'd be in the wings screaming at me, tapping his watch, yelling, get off.

R. Scott Edwards:

Get off.

Daniel Rosen:

Yeah, every night.

R. Scott Edwards:

Isn't that funny that as watch they get is as big as these people are, they are still concerned about the competition. You know, Mickey Rooney is a star several times over, and yet he found you, you know, or talented people competitive. And there was the same situation with Johnny Carson. He was really good at developing new acts, but if you got too good or you were taking away a little bit of his spotlight, he could, he could be difficult.

Daniel Rosen:

Sure. He got angry at me. Johnny Carson did. I did his show twice.

R. Scott Edwards:

You did two shows?

Daniel Rosen:

I did, did his show twice. And then I got my own show opposite Carson. And I didn't know that that had upset him. Our show didn't last very long to me. I just was thrilled I could pay my rent, but to him, I guess it was a big deal. And then years later, I tried to get back on the Tonight show, and they said, oh, Johnny's very angry at Daniel for doing that show without asking permission.

R. Scott Edwards:

No.

Daniel Rosen:

Yeah. I had no idea. Wow. Anyway, but after Sugar baby, Joan Rivers.

R. Scott Edwards:

And a few other people, too, I think.

Daniel Rosen:

Yeah. Yeah.

R. Scott Edwards:

Well, that goes to, back to what I was saying about Mickey Rooney. Sometimes you would think these big superstars like Carson would be comfortable in his own skin, and yet he could be bitter about somebody doing well outside of his world. That is just so weird. Now, you've just, in a short time, you go from the streets to the boards of Broadway to television spots like the Tonight show. You and I know, because we're in the business, that getting a Tonight show is, you know, you make$600 and you get a little fame and fortune. It helps you draw crowds at other gigs. But like you said, it doesn't pay the rent week to week. What transitioned you to, I think, was your first real job? The price is right?

Daniel Rosen:

Oh, let's see. Well, I mean, first there was lots and lots and lots of comedy clubs, right? And then, too, right?

R. Scott Edwards:

Weren't you touring?

Daniel Rosen:

I worked in Vegas.

R. Scott Edwards:

Robin Williams.

Daniel Rosen:

Sure. And I opened for lots and lots of people. Julio Iglesias, all kinds of people. I would be the opening act and get the crowd whooped up.

R. Scott Edwards:

So this is, this is all in your mid twenties still, right?

Daniel Rosen:

Sure, twenties and thirties. And then I was more and more on the road doing comedy clubs. Those started to dry up. Then I started working on cruise ships. Then I got this really weird gig, a gig that I never intended to go after. All of a sudden, I got hired to be the announcer of. It was a road version of the price is right game show. It was at a casino in Reno. Was it Harrison? Reno. And they were doing the prices right live. And I turned down the gig at first, but then I ended up being talked into it. And by my manager at the time, it ended up being really fun. It was not just being the announcer, but whooping up the crowd and doing what I do. And it was so much fun. I loved it. And I wrote all these bits, and I was like, I came out in a pink suit and I was like an evangelist getting the crowd on their feet. And it was just crazy. It was so much fun. It was like the most fun gig I've ever had. Yeah. And then a few months into it, because it was a big deal, all the people who ran the price is right tv show came up to see it. And then shortly after that, this was really unfortunate. But Rod, Roddy, who was the longtime announcer of the tv show, he died. And suddenly I'm on the tv show with Bob Barker, which was a whole lot of fun. Yeah. Wow. Come on down.

R. Scott Edwards:

Yeah. Bob Barker working with a name that'll go down in history as one of the game show masters of all time. But again, I think it's really fascinating, the trajectory of your career on how one thing led to another, led to another. And I'm going to repeat this because I think it's so important for people that are interested in show business. It all started with the foundation on the streets and your hard work to get into the ice Capades, and then the hard work on the boards of New York to touring with people. I mean, these are all exceptional opportunities, but they were earned. You had to bring it, as they would say, each and every time, and each and every time you're learning something new. And by the time you're in your thirties and getting these opportunities on tv, I no doubt they saw the value of having somebody. And we should explain to the audience that the announcer or front man or warm up guy is so important to all tv shows. Have them. And it's the person that keeps the crowd entertained during camera moves or scene changes or script changes. You know, it could take 6 hours to shoot a half hour show. Guess what? It's the show warm up guy that's trying to keep the audience awake.

Daniel Rosen:

Right? Sure.

R. Scott Edwards:

I mean, you, you had to have the skills to keep that audience riveted and then still have the energy for the prices. Right. And working with Bob Barker, how was that?

Daniel Rosen:

He's amazing on camera. He's just a master. He was a lot like, had the skills of Carson. He really knew how to make the contestants stars. And he also reminded me a lot of jack Benny in his delivery. Very, very, very funny guy.

R. Scott Edwards:

Yeah, well, that's a great reference because, you know, we only saw him on tv, but like you said, I think what made him a success was his down to earth and funny interactions with the audience.

Daniel Rosen:

Yes. On camera, amazing. Off camera, a little scary. It was really scary. Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah. But on camera, just a master. I would study him every night. Yeah. So that was, but that's, I had.

R. Scott Edwards:

Another, oh, I'm interrupting, and I apologize, but both Mickey Rooney and Bob Barker and Johnny Carson, amazing, friendly on stage and backstage, a little scary.

Daniel Rosen:

Sure. Yeah.

R. Scott Edwards:

It's just so interesting, that aspect to show business that people don't see, right?

Daniel Rosen:

Absolutely. Oh, I'll tell you another thing that, a weird gig that landed in my lap. I was going through a breakup with a girl, and I, for some reason, I was obsessed with music software. And so I kept buying more and more music software. And then when I broke up with this girl, I didn't know what to do, and I started making weird music out of her phone messages and just strange things because I kind of locked myself up and wasn't talking to people and friends were calling to see if I was okay. And I made these weird songs out of these loops of voice messages. And then when I decided to resurface after, you know, grieving the end of this relationship, I played this music for my manager, Rick, and I said, listen to this weird stuff I've been doing. And I played him the songs, and he was about to produce a tv show in England. And he said, wow, you need to be the musical director of this show. And next thing I know, I'm flying to England and I'm writing all the music for this tv show. And then I'm also the announcer and sidekick. It was a tv, yeah. Chat show called Strassman. I don't know if you know David.

R. Scott Edwards:

Strassman, he's on my list to ask you about. David and I are great friends. He worked for me for years. He's been on this podcast already, twice.

Daniel Rosen:

Wow.

R. Scott Edwards:

I didn't realize that was the connection or that you did any work in England.

Daniel Rosen:

Man.

R. Scott Edwards:

Daniel, your career has taken so many interesting directions. It is incredible. So your manager got you into the show in England. How long were you on that gig?

Daniel Rosen:

I don't know how many shows? We did, like 20 or so. We were there for a few months. It was amazing fun, and it was great. The audiences were great. It was really good. He was very good.

R. Scott Edwards:

Yeah, Dave, he was the host, and Dave's a pretty easy going. I mean, hopefully he wasn't like some of the others we talked about. I know Dave is an easy going guy, offstage and on. He always thrilled my audiences. But, and I know of his success in Australia, but I'm not aware of this show in England. Was it successful?

Daniel Rosen:

It was a hugely successful show. It was great. He was huge in England, England, Australia, and New Zealand. Yeah. Amazing act.

R. Scott Edwards:

Yeah. That may have led to a success in Australia, but being chosen as a music director, I mean, that is so out of left field again. I mean, you're going from the streets, the Ice Capades, to music director. I mean, Daniel, that's such an expression of your talent.

Daniel Rosen:

Well, thanks. I should tell you about the weirdest change of all that got me to what I'm doing today. Would that be interesting?

R. Scott Edwards:

Before we get to that, yeah, I wanted to ask about. We talked about different people you worked with. How was it working and traveling with people like Robin Williams and Bette Midler? I mean, we think of her as just an hysterical, fun person. You toured with some huge names. Did anybody stand out and talk? You know, maybe mentored you or taught you something, or was there some, somebody that was a nightmare like some of these others?

Daniel Rosen:

Well, you know, I worked with a lot of stars, and the way I would keep my gig was keeping a low profile and not being in the way, not so I didn't hang out with them.

R. Scott Edwards:

Well, that's probably smart. Keep yourself separate from the personalities of the, the stars. Interesting, though. Interesting and probably smart business, show business wise, to keep yourself capsulated and separate from who you are opening for. But traveling with those kinds of shows, again, another experience that must have helped you grow as an entertainer.

Daniel Rosen:

Oh, definitely. Definitely. Especially sometimes you're opening for some big music act, and then the best was when you're opening for somebody who does comedy like Bette Midler opening for her was amazing. Robin Williams, all the other big comedy people opening for them, their crowd had come to laugh. But when it's a big music star, the crowd can be brutal, right?

R. Scott Edwards:

Because they're.

Daniel Rosen:

They could just.

R. Scott Edwards:

Yeah, they're there for the music. Maybe Sinatra or Inglesias, as you mentioned. And all of a sudden, there's a comic juggler on stage. It may have thrown him a bit.

Daniel Rosen:

And they're yelling, we won. Julio. He'll be out here soon. He wants to see me do this first.

R. Scott Edwards:

Well, that's another aspect to show business that I think a lot of people don't realize. It can make it challenging, but you have gotten through so many barriers and created so many opportunities through your focus and hard work. One other thing before we get to your last story. Cause I know what's coming. Where in this did you end up on Nash Bridges as an actual actor?

Daniel Rosen:

Oh, okay. That was wild. Okay. So my manager was Rick Marcelli, and I have, you know, every act that wanted to get booked at last unlimited would have this amazing sizzle reel that they would send you. And my sizzle reel was, well, it had a lot of Johnny Carson and other shows that by that point seemed really, really old and ancient. And I thought, this just. I may as well have Ed Sullivan on my tape. It makes me look so old. So I got rid of all my tape, and I made a new tape, and I said, let's rick. And I cooked this up. We said, let's make a tape that looks like I'm a guy who really has it together but has never been discovered and make it really, really homemade. So I made this really primitive looking tape, and basically, we made up this story that he discovered me sleeping in his car, and people bought it, and they thought I was this guy. And in the tape, I was, like, crawling out of a trash can and a dumpster, and I'm wearing clothes that are tattered, and I just looked like a mess. But the stuff I was doing was funny. And anyways, they were casting for a street juggler for Nash bridges, and he was supposed to be homeless. And I thought, that's me. And we sent the tape, and they thought that I really was this guy. He told him the story of me sleeping in his car, and they bought it, and they had me on, and it worked. And they kept having me on again and again, doing different parts of my act, being this, you know, dopey street performer who gets in a lot of trouble. It was a lot of fun.

R. Scott Edwards:

Yeah, I mean, first off, it was the character was Eddie Green. You're still performing, you're juggling in your comedy, but now you're incorporating more acting, which I think is interesting. Were you like a Ci for Nash bridges? Was what was the reason to keep bringing you back? Or you were just getting arrested a lot?

Daniel Rosen:

I kept getting in trouble. There was one show I claimed to have shot and killed a guy. Really, it was just to impress a girl, and I didn't really do it.

R. Scott Edwards:

That's one way to meet a woman. Well, yeah, just again, Daniel. And I'm stopped with the amazement, I guess. But your career has had so many different aspects. It's just fascinating. Now you're. At what age were you able to finally purchase a home?

Daniel Rosen:

Well, that came from the price is right. The price is right was my longest gig. I did that for about ten years.

R. Scott Edwards:

Wow, ten years?

Daniel Rosen:

Yeah, ten years on and off. But, yeah, it was a long gig. And I finally was able to save up enough to buy this little house, this little messed up house. I lived in there with no kitchen and no bathroom for almost a year while I slowly fixed it up. But even though it's this little messed up house, I made it look nice. And I was really proud of that house because finally I'd achieved something. And then one day, a bank error destroyed my credit, and I almost lost my house. And it was a disaster. Because of the bank error, all my bills shot up, and we were on break from the show, and I didn't have money for the bigger bills, and it was just a disaster. And I didn't have money to. I put all my money in this house, and I didn't have money to hire a credit repair company to help me to sort things out. So I started studying about credit repair and credit laws and how that all works. And slowly, I started working on my own credit and sending off letters and trying to. I called the bank. The bank said, oh, sorry, we made a mistake. We'll fix it. But they couldn't fix the domino effect on all my other credit cards that had jumped up. And of course, they were all maxed out already because of all the work done on the house. So I was really screwed with these giant bills. So I'm sending letters to the credit bureaus and the creditors, and this whole time, I'm studying credit repair, and I start helping other friends. And I start realizing not only was I able to fix my own credit, my score went back up, but I started helping other friends. I started seeing there are lots and lots of people that get hurt by credit. I started realizing the whole way the credit system is set up is to hurt people, especially the poor, who pay the most. If you, the moment you fall behind, your bills go up and it's really ugly. And I'm doing all this repetitive work, and I kept thinking, this is really repetitive, there should be software for this. And I kept looking for credit repair software and there wasn't any. And that's when I thought, aha. I found my way out of show business. I'm going to create the world's first credit repair software. But I had no idea how to, how to write code or really anything about business. I didn't even graduate high school. But I kept drawing what I wanted to build and kept trying to figure out how to make it. And after about five years, I figured it out. I hired a coder, I drew all the pages, we built it, and I had this little download that was called credit aid. And there I was on the COVID in a doctor's suit with a stethoscope. I was the credit doctor. And I thought this was going to be an infomercial product. I wanted to be like that guy. Remember the guy with all the question marks all over his coat?

R. Scott Edwards:

Right, right.

Daniel Rosen:

I wanted to be like that guy. So I would sell this download and then sold in some stores in a box. I'd sell it for $20. I'd sell a few a week. So in a good week I could maybe make$100. It was not a very good business, but I tried for about ten years to make it work and really, really struggled. But then something kind of amazing happened. Businesses started calling me, wanting a larger version to help their clients, like mortgage brokers and realtors and companies that depend on having customers with good credit. And they're turning away people who don't have good credit. So they all wanted to help their clients. So I realized, oh, I need to make this a bigger thing. It needs to be online, it needs to be a subscription. So I'm not just getting a $20 sale and never seeing that person again. It needs to be something you can run a whole business on. So I locked myself in a room for about five years, and all I did was try to figure out how to make this thing. And after about five years, all through the time of the bad economy, 2008 to twelve, where the economic meltdown, that's when I was building this thing. And I kept thinking, if I just keep going, I'll eventually be in the right place at the right time. And I launched it right as the economy was starting to come back in 2013 and I got lucky and people started buying it and started running, built businesses on it, and it caught traction and people started building big businesses on it. I've had over 50 people make over a million dollars on a business that they launched on my software. It's their own business. It's not a pyramid scheme or anything. They just buy a license to the software and then they run their business how they like.

R. Scott Edwards:

That's what they do with it that makes them the millionaire. It's you again. You created the foundation of credit recovery, and then you were able to sell and license this to other people and companies that were able to take it and make a lot of money. We should let everybody know that Daniel Rosen is the CEO, owner and creator of the company credit repaircloud.com. That's credit repaircloud.com dot, if you want to check it out, if you have any interest in the industry. What year? I mean, you had all these years of focus and determination to make this happen. When, at what age did it kind of happen for you?

Daniel Rosen:

Well, I started building this 20 years ago when I was 40. I'm 60 now. So it was a long, long, slow road. But now most credit repair companies in America run on my software.

R. Scott Edwards:

And you yourself, the guy that came out of the car in the dumpster, the CEO of a multimillion dollar company, and you've had amazing success. And I think that what's interesting about you, Daniel, is that you've had, you're a creative genius, and you've used that talent, that determination, focus, that drive over the years to reach the goals that you set for yourself. One, it was survival on the street, then it was getting in the ice Capades, then it was getting into the clubs, then getting on the tv. You kind of took a side turn and became a music director. You had all these opportunities because you did the hard work and focused and were able to create something out of nothing. And that's the same for creditrepaircloud.com dot. It didn't just happen overnight. You tweaked it, you worked on it, you studied, you focused, and now you're a multimillionaire due to it. But it is just the culmination of decades of hard work and focus. Very exciting career in life. Daniel, I know it wasn't easy most of the time, but you've been able to reap the rewards. And congratulations.

Daniel Rosen:

Well, thank you. And the best part is now I get to sleep in my own bed every night. I don't have to be on the road. I can have a girlfriend and a dog and the life that I, that I kind of missed out on all those years on the road.

R. Scott Edwards:

Yeah. And again, for the people interested in show business and everything we've been talking about, listening to this podcast, it is very difficult. There can be a lot of success. A lot of great, interesting things can happen to you like they have for Daniel. But life on the road, life and entertainment can be challenging and does make it difficult to lay down roots, as they say. And you transitioning out of show business and into being a multi million dollar CEO in the credit repair industry, again, as a tribute to your talents and your determination to get something done. But you had a lot of success in show business. You were just able to take what you learned as a person about the, that focus and determination and the hard work to create this company. And just so, so excited for you, Daniel. I know people are going to be checking out creditrepaircloud.com. Is there any other way that you'd like them to contact you or reach the company?

Daniel Rosen:

No, no, that's the best way.

R. Scott Edwards:

Creditrepaircloud.com well, ladies and gentlemen, if you have any interest in starting your own offshoot credit repair business, if you have credit issues yourself, there's a lot of great free advice and opportunity. I've been to the website cloud repair. Excuse me, credit repaircloud.com dot. Make sure you check it out. Daniel, I am so happy that you took the time to share your story with us. It's such an exciting and diverse path that you took to success in all these different ways. Thank you so much for being on the podcast.

Daniel Rosen:

Thank you for having me. This was a lot of fun.

R. Scott Edwards:

Well, Daniel, there's even more fun for the audience. With your permission, I've pulled about three minutes of material from one of your cruise ship gigs, and I'm going to share with the audience a little bit of your old entertainment. Now, you're, you're pretty much done with show business because of the millions you've made. But up until what age? So you started about 15. At what age did you kind of hang up your juggling mastery?

Daniel Rosen:

Well, I, last time I did my actual juggling and comedy act was 2007, and then I continued to do prices right through 2013.

R. Scott Edwards:

Wow. Well, again, an amazing career, Daniel. Thanks for being on the podcast. Ladies and gentlemen, in just a minute, a little bit of comedy by Daniel, everybody. Check out creditrepaircloud.com dot Daniel Rosen. One of the world class jugglers, actors, music director, performer, comedian. He does it all. Thanks for being with us.

Daniel Rosen:

And software CEO, thank you.

R. Scott Edwards:

Let's not forget the best part. Software CEO. Thanks, Daniel.

Daniel Rosen:

Thank you, Dan. And I'm ready for fancy props and things like the other guys when I was starting out. See, I used to do my act on street corners back in Los Angeles when I was a kid. See, I left home when it's been, I was very young and I left school because the other kids were so mean to me. Just because I was a little different. They'd pick on me, call me names, try to look up my dress. So I left home and I lived in a box downtown until a bus ran over it. Then I lived in a flat. This is what's left right here. I'm not homeless yet anymore, but I still date homeless women. Homeless women are the best to date. You know what I mean? Yeah, homeless women are the best to date. Because when the date's over, you can drop them anywhere. Yeah. Get out of my cart. It was always my big fantasy to invite three or four of them back home to my dumpster for a little garbage etoire. Here's a good one. Can't touch this. There's a chinese song. It's called tuning. I'm probably the greatest banjo player that ever lived. And I wrote all these songs myself, too. I wrote this one today while you were all having fun. I wrote this. Think it's gonna be a big head. There is a steward on deck three and his name is Haji and he's buying a seven. He let heaven damn the funk song and then the song my grandfather used to sing me to sleep with back when I was a little girl.

R. Scott Edwards:

Wow. Ladies and gentlemen, that was a great story of Daniel Rosen's life and entertainment and now his new career career as the CEO. And I hope you enjoyed his live stage entertainment that was recorded on one of his many cruise ship gigs. And I just wanted to give you an idea of what he was like on stage. Hey, it was a real honor to chat with Daniel again. We haven't worked together in a couple decades, so I'm so glad I could bring that to you. Hey, next week we'll have another great show. Thanks for listening. Be sure to tell your friends and family and have a great week. Bye.

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